Art Paul, Art Director Who Gave Playboy Its Look, Dies at 93 – The New York Times

women reading playboy

Photo by Les Anderson on Unsplash

Probably the coolest thing about this story of Art Paul is that through his work and his innovations, he opened a whole new profession for artists who would have otherwise simply chosen a more traditional route for their careers.

More personally, I remember my Dad showing me at one point how that playboy logo was hidden on every cover of the magazine and from time to time found myself fascinated with trying to find it.

-John

“Paul understood that the balance between nude photography and sophisticated writing was the key to separating Playboy from a pulp girlie magazine,” Steven Heller, co-chairman of the design department at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, wrote in an email. “So he balanced the literary aesthetic of The New Yorker with the visual audacity of Esquire and created a format that evoked both seriousness and playfulness.” Mr. Holland, who began illustrating “Ribald Classics” stories for Playboy in 1968, said

Source: Art Paul, Art Director Who Gave Playboy Its Look, Dies at 93 – The New York Times

Clarence Beavers, Last of a Black Paratroop Unit, Dies at 96 – The New York Times

Clarence died back in 2017.  I just found his obituary today.  His is a great example of why I started paying more attention to obituaries in 2018.  My position at Frazer Consultants started this journey, and once I embarked on this odyssey, I quickly discovered why so many people are so fascinated with obituaries.  For me, it’s the chance to gain inspiration from someone who until now, you may not have even known existed.  In cases of familiarity with the deceased, the experience is still very similar.   In that moment, where their life story is revealed to you, their legacy becomes part of you.  Sometimes this cathartic engagement is more profound than others.  The important thing is that in their death, you have connected to their legacy, which inspires the life you’re still living in meaningful ways.

-John

Clarence Beavers, the last surviving member of a groundbreaking group of black paratroopers deployed during World War II against what were described as the world’s first intercontinental-range airborne weapons — giant bomb-laden balloons launched from Japan and aimed at North America — died on Dec. 4 at his home in Huntington, N.Y. He was 96.

Source: Clarence Beavers, Last of a Black Paratroop Unit, Dies at 96 – The New York Times

Dr. Samuel Epstein, 91, Cassandra of Cancer Prevention, Dies – The New York Times

Dr. Epstein did not live his life in a bubble, but he sought to avoid tobacco, X-rays, pesticides, saccharin, talcum powder, cyclamates used as preservatives, hair spray with vinyl chloride, hot dogs dyed with nitrites, milk from cows injected with genetically engineered growth hormones and pajamas treated with a certain flame retardant — all of which he considered carcinogenic.

Source: Dr. Samuel Epstein, 91, Cassandra of Cancer Prevention, Dies – The New York Times