Penny Marshall, TV Sitcom Star and Hollywood Director, Dies at 75 – The New York Times

Penny Marshall Dies at 75

Ms. Marshall became the first woman to direct a feature film that grossed more than $100 million when she made “Big” (1988). That movie, a comedy about a 12-year-old boy who magically turns into an adult (Tom Hanks) and then has to navigate the grown-up world, was as popular with critics as it was with audiences.

Source: Penny Marshall, TV Sitcom Star and Hollywood Director, Dies at 75 – The New York Times

Patricia Quintana, Champion of Mexican Cuisine, Dies at 72 – The New York Times

patricia quintana dies at 72

Patricia Quintana, the chef and author whose work exalted the range and sophistication of Mexican cuisine, died on Monday at her home in Mexico City. She was 72.

She wore a white chef jacket in defiance of a male-dominated culture that didn’t see women as professional chefs.  She celebrated Mexican heritage through her work as a phenomenal chef.  She has inspired many others to do the same.

-John

Source: Patricia Quintana, Champion of Mexican Cuisine, Dies at 72 – The New York Times

George Bush, 41st President, Dies at 94

george-h-w-bush-41st-preisdent Source: George Bush, 41st President, Dies at 94 – The New York Times Click here for more great photos of George H.W. Bush.  The 41st president of the United States In the end, a peaceful passing for the president
His friendship has been one of the great gifts of my life – former president Bill Clinton
Six touching moments from the funeral of George H. W. Bush Honoring and Remembering George H. W. Bush – this is a great post from Frazer Consultants George H.W. Bush’s service dog rests near his casket in moving photo – Mission Complete!
My Eulogy for President George H. W. Bush written by john c ashworth I can remember the evening clearly. Glued to the television inside a suite mate’s dorm room in college, we watched expectantly, wondering if it might finally happen. We finally got either tired of waiting or just too hungry and headed over to the cafeteria for dinner. Upon our return, Tom’s voice bellowed from inside his room…”We bombed em’ gentlemen!” He said with a strong taste of pride. Tom had been in the air force before arriving at Quincy college for soccer camp that year.  He had a little different perspective on what was happening. For the rest of us, the experience was somewhat surreal. The sites and sounds of an actual war were not something any of us had experienced first-hand ever before. I remember listening to and watching the anti-aircraft guns as they shot fireworks across the sky and it was then that I understood why we do what we do every fourth of July. The feelings and images combined to produce a wierd combination of excitement and fear. We had no idea what might happen next. Soon, of course, we all grew a little numb to the exercise. Watching video footage of bombs hitting distant targets becomes tiresome and rote quite quickly. In fact, much of it looked like the same footage played over and over again. One of the images that stands true and memorable for me, of course, is that of President Goerge H. W. Bush. Firmly confirming what we had decided to do, and why.  Confidently explaining to us that America was in charge. It didn’t take very long before we believed that was true. Iraq was no match for the volume and sophistication of force that is the US Military. Listening to others eulogize the president during the state funeral service, I was transported back to that time. When he was young, strong, and in complete control and charge of both himself, his country, and his military. I was grateful for him as my president. And I am even more grateful for him today. Last year, during the super bowl, he appeared just before the game to initiate the coin toss. I was very glad to see him and my heart sank a little. He looked old and frail and I immediately wondered whether or not he would be here for the next one. I have my answer now. Still, for some reason, I will always feel a great deal of gratitude that he was able to make that appearance. It appeared to please him and his wife, Barbara, greatly. Maybe even more than it did me.  It was the last time I personally ever saw them alive together. I encourage you to spend some time with this page on my blog. This tribute to the man that coined the beautiful phrase, “a thousand points of light.” He was a good man. A hard working man. A loving and kind and generous man. A humble man. A family man. That is the part that really came through today as I watched his body transported from the capital to the cathedral, and then off to the airport so that he could fly to Texas one more time. The part of the story that shows us his love and his humility. His devotion to his country and to serving that country with undying loyalty. He left us a great legacy. A legacy worth full immersion so that each of us can take some of that light and keep it shining forward. -John In helping to inspire the impact of his legacy on all of us, I collected a number of poignant statements from his funeral service today. I hope you’ll find as much inspiration from them as I did.
From each day forward after he was shot down in World War II, to him, his life was no longer his own. His gratitude for being spared inspired his commitment to serve. The key to a good George H.W. Bush impersonation according to Dana Carvey, is in cultivating a careful combination of Mr Rogers and John Wayne. George H.W. Bush was as a believer and student of what he saw as the science of relationships. Great Quotes
“He was our shield in danger’s hour.” -John Meacham, Historian
“Politics is not a pure undertaking.” -George H.W. Bush
“What would we do without family and friends.” -George H. W. Bush
“One thousand points of light.” -George H. W. Bush
Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act Public service is noble and necessary. Humility is necessary to enter the kingdom of God. Failure is part of living a full life, and failure should NEVER define YOU. He was sustained by the love of the almighty. As a father, he encouraged and comforted, but NEVER steered. Faith is more than words. In death, Life is changed, not ended. Your service and your legacy are important to God.
Those who travel the high road of humility in Washington, as Bush did, do not see a lot of traffic.  Senator Alan Simpson
George H. W. Bush was one of nature’s noblemen. He was always a friend to his friends. He thought about his crew mates on the plane that was shot down for the rest of his life. His optimism made his children believe that anything is possible.
“Without faith, we are not but a stained glass window in the dark.” -The priest at George H W Bush’s state funeral
RIP The Bicentennial Presidential Inauguration by George H W Bush
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MW1c2PeZu9M
Click here for a history of Presidential Funerals

Stan Lee Is Dead at 95; Superhero of Marvel Comics – The New York Times

stan-lee-marvel-comics

If Stan Lee revolutionized the comic book world in the 1960s, which he did, he left as big a stamp — maybe bigger — on the even wider pop culture landscape of today. Think of “Spider-Man,” the blockbuster movie franchise and Broadway spectacle. Think of “Iron Man,” another Hollywood gold-mine series personified by its star, Robert Downey Jr. Think of “Black Panther,” the box-office superhero smash that shattered big screen racial barriers in the process.

Source: Stan Lee Is Dead at 95; Superhero of Marvel Comics – The New York Times

Willie McCovey (1938 – 2018), Hall of Fame San Francisco Giants Slugger | Legacy.com

Six-time All-Star hit over 500 home runs. via @legacyobitsSan Francisco

Giants legend Willie McCovey cracked more than 500 home runs in his Hall of Fame career. McCovey was a Giant for 19 of his 22 seasons in the league and was one of the most beloved players in San Francisco. He died at the age of 80. For full obituary and coverage from Legacy.com.

Career Accomplishments:

First ballot Hall of Famer (1986)

National League Most Valuable Player (1969)

National League Rookie of the Year (1959)

Three-time Home Run Leader (1963, 1968, 1969)

Six-time All-Star (1963, 1966, 1968–1971)

Notable quote: McCovey never won a World Series. His line drive was caught by New York Yankees second baseman Bobby Richardson for the final out in Game 7 of the only World Series he played in. In a 2017 interview with the Wall Street Journal he was asked how he’d like to be remembered.

“I’d like to be remembered as the guy who hit the ball over Bobby Richardson’s head in the seventh game,” he responded.

What people said about him: “You knew right away he wasn’t an ordinary ballplayer. He was so strong, and he had the gift of knowing the strike zone. There’s no telling how many home runs he would have hit if those knees weren’t bothering him all the time and if he played in a park other than Candlestick.” —Hank Aaron, legendary home run hitter

“He used to scare me the most when I was playing first base. I was just praying he wouldn’t hit one down the line. He was one of the most awesome players I’ve ever seen.” —Hall of Famer Joe Torre

Source: Willie McCovey (1938 – 2018), Hall of Fame San Francisco Giants Slugger | Legacy.com