Stop hedging and go all-in

stop hedging

written john c ashworth

John ashworth standing on rock

Stop Hedging and Go All-in.

You will grow personally and professionally a lot faster by helping others grow along with you. In fact, this is one of the best ways to grow your small business and your career. This is also a big part of my mission here on The Ash Flash and in the work I do as a business to business salesman.

When you help others grow. Inspire them. Educate them. Make them feel good about doing business with you and work to really connect with them, both you and your customers win.

The problem is that most businesses get far too caught-up in their day to day struggles and their dire need to make sales right now, and then quickly lose sight of this idea. This opportunity to truly serve.

There are two keys to this….

First, and most important, no matter the context or the topic is this…

If your marketing stinks and you have lead-generation problems, the realities you face as a result of this problem will always limit your ability to truly connect with your customers in the way I’m describing here, because you will always be struggling to find the next one. You will find yourself constantly looking outward instead of also looking inward and cultivating the moment. Cultivating your best customers so that they ascend the ladder of your products and services, spend more money with you, praise your good work publicly and refer more customers more often.

As a side note, referrals don’t happen automatically either. You have to train your customers to do this for you. Generally, it won’t happen automatically. You need systems in your business for everything.

So, how do you foster a business and career culture that promotes cultivation of your customers and all your best relationships?

Stop hedging. Be authentic. Be smart about not overextending yourself, and be strategic in how you go about growing your business. Yes. Those are generalities, but the idea is that if you have a great product that solves a pressing problem for a specific group of individuals, you need to stay focused on that process and on that process alone and expand slowly, quietly, and carefully so as not to disturb the flow of your work, so that you can truly connect with those you serve, and be completely present for the next big idea when it arrives.

In order to make all this happen you have to go all in. You have to give this work and your process everything you possibly have to give and at all times. I won’t kid you. It’s not easy and it’s not always fun.

If you can live a life where the people and the customers you serve who know you the best, like you the most, you will have achieved this careful combination of grit and growth. You will have achieved the ability to be yourself and be successful. Still, it will likely take you longer than you think it should to get there.

The problem is that we all have a constant tendency to hedge, and offer concessions that don’t necessarily jive with our true selves, but that get us by in the moment because when we do this, we can avoid the emotional pain that is often the direct result of sticking to our beliefs.

Here on The Ash Flash it is my goal to be as honest with you as I possibly can, while also providing you important and insightful perspectives that will challenge you to adopt this kind of belief system and this kind of approach to running your small business and running your life. If you are interested in being a part of this community, I encourage you to subscribe to the email list as a first step. Once you are officially a part of the tribe, you will begin to receive additional information and communications from me that may just help you achieve far more than you ever thought possible.

-John

PS Interested in having a conversation about just how you might implement this idea in a strategic way?

Send an email to: johncashworth(at)gmail.com and we’ll start a conversation. It is very likely that right at this moment there are many things I can help you achieve. That’s the magic Johnny Renaissance and my passion for life and true and lasting authenticity.

Peace.

Photo by Álvaro Serrano on Unsplash

This is where the Best opportunities often come from…

written by john c ashworth

The best opportunities in business and in life very often come, not directly from the thing you really want to do, but from the solution or ‘work-around’ you discover while working to overcome the obstacles that are standing in the way of you doing the thing you really want to do.

In the spirit of this idea, I encourage you to open your mind this fine Monday morning and commit to this very important idea as you begin your week.

Instead of falling back into the same patterns of your usual Monday, cultivate acceptance of your obstacles this week and to your own uncanny ability to find creative solutions.

You might just discover one of the greatest ideas of your lifetime.

Good luck! Have fun, and keep going.

-John

A New Mantra For Toyota, and a lesson about Your Personal Brand

Toyota’s in big trouble – no doubt about it! I read an article in The New York Times over the weekend that went into detail about why they’re in so much trouble and what they will need to do about it.

The first paragraph of the article said it all…

“A Japanese leader (Toyota) in the auto industry is accused of negligence, causing
car accidents and dragging its feet with investigators. A giant recall is
ordered, top executives are hauled in front of Congress, and losses snowball.
Consumers flee in droves, trial lawyers lick their chops, and analysts say
the company’s brand is permanently tarnished.”

So, how will Toyota begin the long journey back out of the cave they have dug for themselves?

They’ll have to come out of hiding. Out from behind the anonymity that big corporate execs often get too comfortable in.  Out into the open where everyone can see them, like a movie start out for coffee on a Saturday morning, their hat holding unwashed hair closely under cover.

This will likely be difficult for them.  The Japanese culture is one that prides itself in humility and respect for authority.  As the author of this article pointed out…

“Grandstanding and mea culpas
do not come naturally at Toyota. Like many other Japanese manufacturers, it is driven
by engineers bred to act deliberately. Top managers are often chosen because of their
connections in the company and their skills in the workshop, not their charisma or
links to shareholders or customers.”

When your long time company mantra has been to under promise and over deliver, while remaining as quiet as possible about your success, the job of winning trust from the public again through total exposure, honesty, and authenticity looms large.

For me, I simply found it interesting that in order for Toyota to recover,  they will need to be more personal, open, and transparent.

Much in the same way the rest of us work so hard to build our own personal brands, Toyota will need to move out from behind those quiet walls and scream big promises about how they plan to over deliver.  They will need to move way outside their comfort zones and the norms that have become so commonplace for them.   And ultimately connect directly with their customers.  Something they probably should have been doing more of all along…